200-125 300-115 200-105 200-310 640-911 300-075 300-320 300-360 642-998 QV_DEVELOPER_01 400-101 700-501 117-201 70-696 700-505 600-199 400-351 300-207 TE0-141 100-105 300-101 300-206 300-070 70-417 210-260 210-060 200-355 300-208 CISSP 300-135 210-065 300-209 70-243 70-480 CCA-500 2V0-621D 210-451 400-051 E05-001 1Z0-052 70-410 640-916 VMCE_V9 810-403 070-464 070-243 700-802 70-246 FCBA GPHR DEV-401 C2090-610 SY0-401 712-50 ADM-201 700-039 312-50 MA0-101 648-244 SK0-004 ASF 70-494 70-673 500-005 1Z0-060 C9560-503 640-875 N10-006 98-367 70-534 NS0-505 70-342 CHFP 070-410 640-878 1V0-603 1Z0-804 C8010-250 312-50V9 C2150-508 98-368 CLOUDF 70-411 70-461 220-901 70-488 070-341 PK0-003 E20-547 70-412 70-686 500-285 CISM 101-400 102-400 PDM_2002001060 JN0-100 642-883 CAP 070-347 Kenya’s supreme court has upheld the reelection of president Uhuru Kenyatta | Shabakada Warbaahinta Times

Kenya’s supreme court has upheld the reelection of president Uhuru Kenyatta

Kenya’s supreme court has dismissed two petitions against the Oct. 26 reelection of president Uhuru Kenyatta. In a summary of their judgment, the six-judge bench unanimously decided that the petitions had “no merit” and upheld his win for a second term.

“Having carefully considered the above issues, the specific players in each petition, as well as the constitution and the applicable laws, the court has unanimously determined that the petitions are not merited,” chief justice David Maraga said today (Nov. 20). “As a consequence, the presidential election of 26 Oct. is hereby upheld as is the election of the third respondent,” president Uhuru Kenyatta.

As per the constitution, Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto will now be sworn in on Nov. 28.

The decision comes after violence in the capital spiraled out of control over the weekend, leading to deaths, protests, and destruction of property. On Friday (Nov. 17), at least five people were killed as police dispersed supporters of opposition candidate Raila Odinga, who were welcoming him back from a trip abroad. Four people were also killed over the weekend, while an opposition lawmaker was shot in the leg during scuffles with the police. The opposition National Super Alliance coalition said that “state-sponsored thuggery” was plunging the country into a crisis.

In a majority decision in early September, Kenya’s supreme court called the August reelection of president Uhuru Kenyatta “invalid, null and void” and ordered a new vote be held in 60 days. After blaming the electoral commission for stonewalling meaningful deliberations, Odinga bowed out of the repeat polls in October and urged his supporters to stay home. Kenyatta won the redo with 7.4 million votes or 98% of the total, with more than 12 million registered voters not participating in the polls.

Rejecting the results as a “sham” and “a meaningless exercise,” Odinga called for a campaign of civil disobedience and peaceful resistance in order to safeguard Kenya’s democracy. He also called for an economic boycott targeting companies aligned with the government and the ruling Jubilee party. The results were also challenged in the supreme court by two cases: one filed by a former lawmaker and another by two members of human-rights organizations.

The uncertainty over the repeated elections and court rulings have also deepened the political crisis in the east African nation and intensified the sense of resignation among citizens. Citing political and economic marginalization, opposition-aligned regions have started calling for secession. The political and legal quagmires have also come at a huge cost for the Kenyan taxpayer, with about $600 million spent conducting the two elections.

Source: Quartz

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